“OFAC Removes Colombians, Iranian from Blacklist”

April 30, 2013

The Wall Street Journal on April 30, 2013 released the following:

“The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control said Tuesday it removed 16 Colombians, a Colombian company and an Iranian from its blacklists.

By Samuel Rubenfeld

The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control said Tuesday it removed 16 Colombians, a Colombian company and an Iranian from its blacklists.

A Treasury spokesman said in an email the individuals petitioned OFAC to remove their names, and they provided the office with sufficient information to prove they cut their ties with those that led them to be placed under Kingpin Act sanctions in the first place.

“The decision by OFAC…is evidence of the fair process of administrative review, and shows that inclusion on the SDN List is not always permanent,” the spokesman said.

In addition, OFAC removed Hessam Khoshnevis from its Iran and counter-terrorism sanctions lists. Khoshnevis, a commander in Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, was reportedly killed in Syria by rebels fighting the Bashar al-Assad regime.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“OFAC Removes 11 Names From Sanctions Lists”

March 29, 2013

The Wall Street Journal on March 28, 2013 released the following:

“By Samuel Rubenfeld

The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control removed 10 people and a company from its blacklists on drug traffickers.

The 10 people separately petitioned OFAC to remove their names from the blacklists, and they provided “sufficient information” for OFAC to decide they ended their involvement with people on the blacklist who led them to be included themselves, a Treasury spokesman said.

They had been designated under the Kingpin Act or an executive order targeting Colombian drug traffickers.

The decision, announced in a notice Thursday, demonstrates that inclusion on the blacklists may not always be permanent, the spokesman said in an email.

Any person placed on the OFAC-maintained blacklists can petition to be removed. “In general, proof of changes in circumstances and behavior is key to a successful petition,” the spokesman said.

The full list of those removed on Thursday from OFAC’s blacklists is here.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

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“US Slaps Sanctions on Haqqani Network Suicide Operations Chief”

November 6, 2012

The Wall Street Journal on November 5, 2012 released the following:

“By Samuel Rubenfeld

The U.S. State Department said Monday it placed sanctions on Qari Zakir, the Haqqani Network’s chief of suicide operations.

In addition to the U.S. designation, the United Nations placed Zakir and the Haqqani Network itself on its blacklist, requiring member states to implement an asset freeze, travel ban and arms embargo on both him and the group.

“Today’s U.N. actions demonstrate international resolve in eliminating the Haqqani Network’s ability to execute violent attacks in Afghanistan,” the State Department said in a statement.

The U.S. State Department placed the Haqqani Network on its list of foreign terror organizations in September after years of deliberation. Until then, the U.S. had focused its efforts targeting individual members of the group.

The Haqqani Network, dubbed “the Sopranos of the Afghanistan war” by the New York Times, built an empire out of kidnapping, extortion, smuggling and trucking.

Zakir, along with his role as chief of suicide operations for the network, is the operational commander in Kabul, Takhar, Kunduz and Baghlan provinces in Afghanistan, the State Department said.

He’s responsible for the training program, which includes instruction in small arms, heavy weapons and basic improvised explosive device construction, the State Department said. Since approaching leader Sirajuddin Haqqani in 2008 for financial assistance to expand the group’s influence in northern Afghanistan, Zakir has become a trusted associate and confidant of the group’s leadership.

Separately, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control removed Mohammad Abd El-Hamid Khalil Salah from its blacklist. Salah, an Illinois man who filed a lawsuit in September against Treasury in Chicago federal court, said in court papers he was the only U.S. citizen residing in the U.S. to be placed under sanctions.

In the complaint, Salah said the designation made him was unable to purchase virtually anything from food to a bank account.

OFAC would grant him licenses that, in theory, allowed him to do things like get a job or housing, but because OFAC is the sole determinant of such abilities, he “survives, in other words, only at the sufferance of OFAC,” the complaint said.

A Treasury spokesman said Monday that while evaluating its response to Salah’s legal complaint, OFAC determined it was appropriate to remove him from the blacklist”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


U.S. eases Myanmar sanctions to boost NGO projects

April 18, 2012

Chicago Tribune on April 17, 2012 released the following:

“Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Treasury on Tuesday relaxed sanctions on Myanmar to permit financial transactions to support certain humanitarian and development projects in the country as it moves ahead with democratic reforms after decades of military rule.

The Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control issued a general license authorizing financial transactions for a range of not-for-profit projects and programs in areas such as good governance, health, education and sport.

“We are taking this step today to support a broader range of not-for-profit activity in Burma by private U.S. organizations and individuals to promote increased cooperation between the Burmese and the American people,” a senior Treasury Department official said.

The Obama administration announced this month that it planned to gradually ease certain sanctions on Myanmar, steps that could eventually see bans lifted on U.S. companies investing in or offering financial services to the resource-rich Southeast Asian nation.

The move on sanctions follows a dramatic series of reforms in Myanmar, where Nobel Peace Prize laureate and pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi won a seat in a parliamentary by-election this month that yielded a landslide victory for her party.

“These (steps) were action for action in response to what we viewed as very positive parliamentary elections,” State Department spokesman Mark Toner told a news briefing, adding that additional measures would be forthcoming.

The Treasury’s announcement marked the first of a planned series of modest steps to unravel the complex web of U.S. sanctions that have contributed to the country’s isolation and driven it closer to its powerful neighbor, China.

The United States has said it will name an ambassador to Myanmar after an absence of two decades, set up an office of the U.S. Agency for International Development there and support a regular U.N. Development Program operation in the country.

Future steps to ease sanctions could eventually open the door to U.S. investment in Myanmar’s agriculture, tourism, telecommunications and banking sectors, U.S. officials say.

But U.S. officials say they want to see clear evidence of further reforms, including the release of all political prisoners, concrete steps toward national reconciliation, especially with ethnic groups that say they have long been oppressed by the central government, and an end to any military ties to North Korea.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, in a statement marking Myanmar’s New Year Water Festival on Tuesday, said the last year had seen the country embark “on a historic new path toward democracy and economic development.”

“We look forward to deepening cooperation on a wide range of issues that promote democratization and national reconciliation, from increasing access to education to expanding health care and encouraging a vibrant civil society,” she said.

Pro-democracy advocates have urged the United States to move cautiously, saying sanctions are an important tool to maintain pressure on Myanmar’s government to follow through on pledges of greater democratic openness.

“We need to carefully utilize the sanctions we have by gradually easing them. Major sanctions … should be the last ones to touch,” said Aung Din, president of the U.S. Campaign for Burma.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Treasury Sanctions an Alleged Top Sinaloa Cartel Operative

March 6, 2012

The Wall Street Journal on March 6, 2012 released the following:

“Treasury Sanctions Top Sinaloa Cartel Operative

By Samuel Rubenfeld

The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control said Tuesday it imposed sanctions Jesus Reynaldo Zambada Garcia, a man described as a key operative in Mexico’s Sinaloa drug cartel, along with two Mexican companies for their ties to one of Sinaloa’s drug lords.

The action, taken under the Kingpin Act, freezes any U.S. assets and bans Americans from conducting transactions with them.

Jesus Reynaldo Zambada Garcia controlled a drug trafficking route via the Mexico City International Airport on behalf of his brother, Ismael, who was designated under the Kingpin Act in 2002. Jesus Reynaldo was arrested by Mexico in October 2008 and is awaiting extradition to the U.S., Treasury said.

“OFAC continues to target Ismael Zambada Garcia and his drug trafficking and money laundering network to cripple their influence and deny them access to the U.S. financial system,” said Adam Szubin, in a statement.

Also Tuesday, Treasury designated two Culiacan-based businesses for being owned or controlled by Zynthia Borboa Zazueta, who was sanctioned by OFAC in May 2007.

The companies, Zarka de Occidente S.A. de C.V., is an agricultural firm, and Zarka de Mexico S.A. de C.V., is a retail clothing and accessories business.

OFAC also deleted and changed some names on its blacklist; the full rundown of Tuesday’s moves is here.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.