HSBC suspected of drug cartel links

August 27, 2012

The Irish Times on August 27, 2012 released the following:

“US PROSECUTORS investigating the movement of money by global banks suspect HSBC of laundering money for Mexican drug cartels and transferring money through its US subsidiary for sanctioned nations, including Iran, Sudan and North Korea.

The weight of the accusations could force HSBC, which has set aside $700 million (€560 million) to cover the cost of potential fines, to pay at least $1 billion to settle the inquiry, said authorities with knowledge of the investigation. This would make it the largest such settlement in history.

It comes as UniCredit, Italy’s biggest bank, said its HypoVereinsbank unit was being investigated by US authorities over possible violation of economic sanctions.

HypoVereinsbank “has been co-operating with investigations by the New York county district attorney’s office, the US department of justice and the US treasury department’s office of foreign assets control involving US-sanctioned persons and companies”, the Italian bank said in a statement yesterday.

The money-laundering accusations against HSBC so far are more extensive than the potential violation of US sanctions that is the focus of the investigations against other foreign banks, including Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank of Germany, BNP Paribas and Crédit Agricole of France, and Royal Bank of Scotland, said the law enforcement authorities, who requested anonymity because the investigations are continuing.

“This case is not about HSBC complicity in money laundering,” a spokesman for HSBC said in a statement on Friday. “Rather, it’s about lax compliance standards that fell short of regulators’ expectations and our expectations, and we are absolutely committed to remedying what went wrong and learning from it.”

The other banks either declined to comment or did not respond to requests for comment.

Anxious to resolve the investigation, HSBC reached out to federal prosecutors in July in hopes of securing a settlement by September, according to the law enforcement officials.

But a settlement in the next couple of weeks is highly unlikely, the officials said. – (New York Times service/Bloomberg)”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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U.S. Treasury names Alleged top Guatemalan drug trafficker

January 19, 2012

Chicago Tribune on January 19, 2012 released the following:

“WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Treasury Department named eight individuals and entities on Thursday as drug traffickers, including a Guatemalan drug lord believed to be one of the most prolific Central American narcotics traffickers, and banned Americans from having any dealings with them.

Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control said Guatemalan national Marllory Dadiana Chacon Rossell was the leader of a criminal operation with units in Honduras and Panama that supplied Mexican drug cartels, and connected her to seven other individuals and entities named as drug traffickers.

“Marllory Chacon’s drug trafficking activities and her ties to the Mexican drug cartels make her a critical figure in the narcotics trade,” said the office’s director Adam Szubin.

Chacron Rossell is also under suspicion for laundering tens of millions of U.S. dollars in narcotics proceeds each month, which would make her the most active money launderer in Guatemala, according to Treasury.

One of the people named was Jorge Andres Fernandez Carbajal, Chacon Rossell’s husband, a Honduran citizen that is accused of providing logistical support for his wife’s operation.

OFAC worked with the Drug Enforcement Administration on the investigation and said its action was part of an ongoing effort under the Kingpin Act to apply financial measures against global drug trafficking organizations.

In addition to prohibiting Americans from conducting financial or commercial transactions with the designated traffickers, Treasury said that any of their assets that come under U.S. jurisdiction will be frozen.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.