White House expands reach of sanctions on Syria, Iran

May 1, 2012

Miami Herald on May 1, 2012 released the following:

“BY KEVIN G. HALL
MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday granted the Treasury Department authority to blacklist foreign nationals and companies that help Iran and Syria evade U.S. and international sanctions.

President Barack Obama signed an executive order and notified congressional leaders that he had given Treasury expanded powers to thwart the evasion of U.S. sanctions. These powers give the accused little chance of seeing the evidence against them, but they don’t run afoul of constitutional due-process rights since they apply to foreign entities.

“I have determined that efforts by foreign persons to engage in activities intended to evade U.S. economic and financial sanctions with respect to Iran and Syria undermine our efforts,” the president said in a letter to House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.

The administration hopes that the ever-tightening financial sanctions will force Iran to abandon its nuclear ambitions and the Syrian government to end its oppression of rebels who seek to oust it.

The new executive order allows Treasury to prohibit accused foreign nationals or companies from traveling to the United States and permits the agency to forbid U.S. companies to deal with them.

Treasury and its Office of Foreign Assets Control already have similar powers to lock companies or individuals out of the U.S. banking system, thus effectively shutting them out of the global system. Tuesday’s action was aimed at smaller companies that are helping Iran and Syria skirt the sanctions.

“Both countries are seeking to use non-bank financial institutions,” said a senior Treasury official, who briefed reporters on the condition of anonymity in order to speak freely. The official cited currency exchange houses or trading firms that don’t have a U.S. presence and fly under the radar in assisting Iran and Syria.

The agency didn’t sanction anyone with the announcement Tuesday.

“That will come in due course,” the official said. He added that foreign companies that are abetting Syria and Iran are “put on clear notice that the United States government has a new tool at its disposal to disrupt that activity.”

The official described the new measure as “more nimble and agile.” He said it targeted entities that were “in the cracks out there, where they are not engaged in behavior that would rise to the level of a (prior) designation, but are not readily susceptible to an enforcement action … because they have no U.S. presence.”

Tuesday’s announcement followed months of increasing financial pressure on Iran, including a move in March by the European Union to prevent dozens of Iranian banks from accessing the international system through which banks transfer money electronically. Treasury also has sanctioned most of the leaders of the Iranian banking, shipping and military sectors, as well as most of the family members of Syrian dictator Bashar Assad and his political allies.

For those accused under the new executive order, there won’t be the sorts of due process protections that U.S. citizens or companies are afforded. Treasury officials will share only unclassified information with the accused, meaning they will often be unable to see the information that’s leading to their accusal.

As with the financial provisions of the controversial Patriot Act, the accused can challenge under the Administrative Procedure Act, which covers not the content of the allegation but rather the process. A federal judge, however, would have access to the classified portions of the case should the accused seek legal redress.

“There is certainly a lot of room for abuse,” said Ilya Shapiro, a senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute, a libertarian research center in Washington.

Foreign entities, he said, have fewer rights under the U.S. Constitution, and there’s little chance that the accused will sway courts to force the U.S. government to share details.

“The way the modern courts interpret administration law, they give a wide berth to government agencies. … This seems to be more an issue of policy than constitutional,” Shapiro said.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

           Office Locations

Email:


U.S. eases financial sanctions on Myanmar

April 18, 2012

english.vietnamnet.vn on April 18, 2012 released the following:

“The U.S. Treasury Department announced on Tuesday that it will ease the financial sanctions on Myanmar in order to allow the American non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to operate in the country.

The U.S. government will drop financial sanctions on Americans whose activities are aimed at meeting basic human needs and promoting democracy in the Southeast Asian country, according to Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

To be specific, the activities exempted from sanctions, which are typically carried out by the NGOs, include health, education, good governance and certain non-commercial development initiatives, said the department.

“These were our action for action, if you will, in response to what we viewed as very positive parliamentary elections,” State Department spokesman Mark Toner said in his comment on the announcement.

“I think you’ll see more steps as we implement what we laid out on April 4. You’ll see additional steps,” he told reporters.

On April 4, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced that Washington will ease its financial and investment restrictions on Myanmar, following the landmark parliamentary by- election in the country.

She also said that the United States was expected to nominate an ambassador to Myanmar very soon, to establish an in-country USAID mission and to support a normal country program for the UN Development Program.

Tuesday’s decision by the Treasury Department signaled Washington’s first step to loosen its wide-ranging and longtime sanctions on Myanmar.

Myanmar held its historic parliamentary by-election on April 1, in which the opposition party led by Aung San Suu Kyi secured big gains, winning 43 of 45 parliamentary seats available.

VietNamNet/Xinhuanet”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Impact of Iran Sanctions Widens

April 4, 2012

The New York Times on April 4, 2012 released the following:

“By RICK GLADSTONE

The Iran sanctions effort led by the United States appeared to be causing new fractures in the Iranian economy on Tuesday, with leading oil companies in South Africa and Greece suspending imports of Iran’s crude oil, further signs of emergency self-reliance emerging in Iran, and an influential former Iranian president publicly challenging his country’s anti-American stoicism.

The latest signs of economic distress came as new questions arose about the date and location for resumed talks between Iran and the so-called P5-plus 1 countries — the five permanent members of the Security Council plus Germany — over Iran’s uranium enrichment activities. Iran contends the activities are peaceful but its adversaries suspect they are a cover to develop the capability to make nuclear weapons.

The talks, suspended more than a year ago, are supposed to resume in less than two weeks, but a host country has not been finalized, and Iranian news reports have suggested that the April 13 date may be changed.

On Wednesday, the Iraqi foreign minister, Hoshyar Zebari, told Reuters that a visiting Iranian delegation had suggested Baghdad as a venue, despite earlier indications from senior Iranian officials that they favored Istanbul — the venue of the last, failed talks on the nuclear issue in January 2011.

“The proposal came from them,” Mr. Zebari said, referring to the Iranians.

Mr. Zebari said he would discuss the idea with the ambassadors of the countries involved — the United States, Russia, China, France and Britain in addition to Germany — and would hand over a letter to them. Any further delay in resuming talks would almost certainly lead to Western charges that Tehran is playing for time while its scientists press ahead with uranium enrichment.

While Istanbul once seemed a middle ground between Iran and the outside powers, relations between Turkey and Iran have cooled because of Ankara’s alignment with nations pressing Syria — Iran’s closest regional ally — to end its bloody crackdown on dissent and open a political transition.

The maneuvers in advance of the proposed talks have been accompanied by a tightening array of sanctions aimed at stopping Tehran’s uranium enrichment. But Iran had called the measures a bullying tactic by the West that is doomed to fail. At the same time, Iranian leaders have acknowledged that the sanctions are causing deprivations in the country by severely restricting international financial transactions and sales of crude oil, Iran’s main export. The European Union will tighten the sanctions further starting July 1 with an embargo of Iranian crude oil.

In South Africa, Engen Petroleum, which has been South Africa’s biggest buyer of Iranian oil and is a leading marketer and refiner of petroleum products throughout southern Africa, said Tuesday it was no longer Iran’s customer. “Engen has suspended imports from Iran and our contingency sources are in play,” a company spokeswoman, Tania Landsberg, said in an email, confirming press reports of Engen’s decision.

South Africa, which historically has relied on Iran for a quarter of its imports, had been sending mixed messages regarding Western pressure to reduce Iranian purchases, with recent data suggesting that the country has been buying more crude oil from Iran this year. Engen’s decision to buy elsewhere suggested that the Western pressure was working.

In Greece, Hellenic Petroleum, the country’s leading refiner, also suspended purchases of Iranian crude oil — not because of the impending European Union embargo, but because banking payments to Iran have been rendered unworkable by the financial sanctions already in place, Reuters reported.

Those financial sanctions, including the recent expulsion of Iran’s central bank from a global financial communications network, have reverberated through Iran’s economy, most notably contributing to a sharp drop in the value of Iran’s currency, the rial, against the dollar. The pressure on the currency, which has caused the price of imported goods to soar in Iran, was an underlying theme in a New Year’s message by Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader, strongly urging Iranians to buy only goods made in Iran.

In what appeared to be a step toward enforcing the ayatollah’s exhortation, Iranian trade authorities have now banned 600 imported items. The ban, reported by Sharq, a reformist Iranian newspaper, did not specify the items but quoted Hamid Safdel, director of Iran’s Trade Promotion Organization, as saying Iranian manufacturers also make those items, rendering the imports unnecessary.

While Iranian leaders have presented a unified front of hostility to the sanctions, a disagreement surfaced on Tuesday, when Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, a former president who is now the chairman of the Expediency Council, an advisory panel to the supreme leader, suggested that Iran had erred by failing to befriend Saudi Arabia, the Middle East’s leading oil producer.

The Saudis, who are overwhelmingly Sunni Muslims and harbor wariness toward the Shiite majority in Iran, have pledged to increase their exports to compensate for any supply shortfall caused by the Iranian oil embargo. Saudi cooperation is crucial to the West’s strategy.

“If we had good relations with Saudi Arabia, would the West have been able to impose sanctions?” Mr. Rafsanjani said in the quarterly International Studies Journal, as translated by Agence France-Presse.

Mr. Rafsanjani, whose stature as a pragmatic force in Iranian politics diminished in recent years but now seems to be reviving, also reiterated his longstanding suggestion that Iran restore diplomatic relations with the United States, estranged since the 1979 revolution. His view is directly at odds with that of Ayatollah Khamenei, who appears to see any conciliatory gesture as a sign of weakness.

“”The meaning of negotiation is not that we submit to them,” Mr. Rafsanjani wrote in what seemed a rejoinder to the ayatollah. “We negotiate, and if they accept our positions or we accept theirs, then it is done.””

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
OFAC SDN Removal Videos:

OFAC Litigation – SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN List Removal

OFAC SDN Removal Attorneys

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Recent OFAC Actions: Non-Proliferation Designations

March 31, 2011

As of today, OFAC has designated several assets and made several changes to existing non-proliferation designations. OFAC has also removed several designations from the Specially Designated Nationals List (SDN List).

Under the non-proliferation sanctions program, OFAC has the ability to designate individuals, organizations, entities and assets on the SDN List in an effort to isolate them from U.S. financial and commercial systems.

Vessels, the primary target of today’s OFAC actions, are typically designated under the non-proliferation sanctions because they are capable of transporting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Today’s designations include vessels that are allegedly associated with the Islamic Republic of Iran of Shipping Lines (IRISL).

To view OFAC’s press release which goes into more detail regarding today’s designations, please click here.

The following vessels have been added to OFAC’s SDN List:

DORITA (f.k.a. IRAN MOEIN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 8605234 (Iran) (vessel) [NPWMD]

KADOS (f.k.a. IRAN SAHEL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9137258 (Iran) (vessel) [NPWMD]

SALIM; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9465851 (Malta) (vessel) [NPWMD]

The following deletions have been made to OFAC’s SDN list:

DEVELOPER (a.k.a. IRAN DEVELOPER) Bulk Carrier 43,300DWT 25,768GRT IRAN flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 8309660 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN DEVELOPER (a.k.a. DEVELOPER) Bulk Carrier 43,300DWT 25,768GRT IRAN flag (IRISL) (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN AZADI Bulk Carrier 35,839DWT 20,672GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7632838 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN BAGHAEI General Cargo 17,945DWT 13,914GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7502734 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN BAGHERI General Cargo 17,928DWT 13,914GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7428811 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN BROOJERDI General Cargo 17,929DWT 13,914GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7502722 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN MAHALLATI General Cargo 17,982DWT 13,914GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7428823 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN MODARES Bulk Carrier 33,663DWT 20,049GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7618985 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN NABUVAT General Cargo 19,212DWT 14,856GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7618571 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN TAKHTI General Cargo 23,720DWT 16,173GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7602194 (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN TEYFOURI General Cargo 23,720DWT 16,173GRT Iran flag (IRISL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 7602211 (vessel) [NPWMD]

The following changes have been made to OFAC’s SDN list:

DAFFODIL (a.k.a. ELEVENTH OCEAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9209324 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
DAFFODIL (|f.k.a. ELEVENTH OCEAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9209324 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

DANDLE (a.k.a. TWELFTH OCEAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9209348 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
DANDLE (|f.k.a. TWELFTH OCEAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9209348 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

DECKER (a.k.a. FIFTH OCEAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9349667 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
DECKER (|f.k.a. FIFTH OCEAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9349667 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

EIGHTH OCEAN; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165803 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
EIGHTH OCEAN|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165803 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

GABION (a.k.a. SEVENTH OCEAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165786 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
GABION (|f.k.a. SEVENTH OCEAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165786 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

GALAX (a.k.a. NINTH OCEAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165798 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
GALAX (|f.k.a. NINTH OCEAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165798 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

GLADIOLUS (a.k.a. TENTH OCEAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165815 (Germany) (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
GLADIOLUS (|f.k.a. TENTH OCEAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9165815 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

HAFIZ DARYA SHIPPING CO (a.k.a. HAFIZ DARYA SHIPPING LINES COMPANY; a.k.a. HDS LINES), No 60, Ehteshamiyeh Square, 7th Neyestan Street, Pasdaran Avenue, Tehran, Iran; Business Registration Document # 5478431 issued Mar 2009 [NPWMD]
-to-
HAFIZ DARYA SHIPPING CO (a.k.a. HAFIZ DARYA SHIPPING LINES COMPANY; a.k.a. HDS LINES), |No 60, Ehteshamiyeh Square, 7th Neyestan Street, Pasdaran Avenue, Tehran, Iran; BIC Container Code HDXU; Business Registration Document # 5478431 issued Mar 2009| [NPWMD]

IRAN GOLESTAN; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9226944 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|GOLESTAN| (|f.k.a. IRAN GOLESTAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9226944 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN HAMADAN; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9226956 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|HAMADAN| (|f.k.a. IRAN HAMADAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9226956 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN MAZANDARAN; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9193197 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|MAZANDARAN| (|f.k.a. IRAN MAZANDARAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9193197 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN NOWSHAHR; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9367994 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|SANIA| (|f.k.a. IRAN NOWSHAHR|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9367994 (Iran)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

IRAN TORKAMAN; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9368015 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|SOMIA| (|f.k.a. IRAN TORKAMAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9368015 (Iran)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

KHORASAN (a.k.a. IRAN KHORASAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9193214 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|DORSAN| (|f.k.a. IRAN KHORASAN; f.k.a. KHORASAN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9193214 (Malta)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

LANCELIN (a.k.a. IRAN YAZD); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9213387 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|ATENA| (|f.k.a. IRAN YAZD; f.k.a. LANCELIN|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9213387 (Cyprus)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

SAKAS (a.k.a. IRAN PIROOZI); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283007 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|PARMIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN PIROOZI; f.k.a. SAKAS|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283007 (Barbados)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

SEIBOW LOGISTICS LIMITED, Room 803, 8/F, Futura Plaza, 111 How Kimg St, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China; Business Registration Document # 1218675 issued 18 Mar 2008 [NPWMD]
-to-
SEIBOW LOGISTICS LIMITED, |Room 803, 8/F, Futura Plaza, 111 How Kimg St, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China; BIC Container Code SBAU; Business Registration Document # 1218675 issued 18 Mar 2008| [NPWMD]

SEPANTA (a.k.a. IRAN ARDEBIL); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9284154 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|TANDIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN ARDEBIL; f.k.a. SEPANTA|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9284154 (Barbados)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

SEPITAM (a.k.a. IRAN ILAM); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283033 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|HADIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN ILAM; f.k.a. SEPITAM|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283033 (Barbados)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

SEWAK (a.k.a. IRAN FARS); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283021 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|SALIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN FARS; f.k.a. SEWAK|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283021 (Barbados)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

SIMBER (a.k.a. IRAN YASOOJ); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9284142 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|PARDIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN YASOOJ; f.k.a. SIMBER|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9284142 (Barbados)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

VISEA (a.k.a. IRAN ZANJAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283019 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|ARMIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN ZANJAN; f.k.a. VISEA|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9283019 (Barbados)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

ZAWA (a.k.a. IRAN AZARBAYJAN); Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9193185 (vessel) [NPWMD]
-to-
|NAFIS| (|f.k.a. IRAN AZARBAYJAN; f.k.a. ZAWA|)|; Vessel Registration Identification IMO 9193185 (Cyprus)| (vessel) [NPWMD]

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share


OFAC Removes Entity from SDN List

March 31, 2011

Yesterday the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) removed an entity from the Specially Designated Nationals List (SDN List). The entity was designated under OFAC’s counter narcotics trafficking sanctions program (SDNTK).

OFAC currently has two counter narcotics trafficking sanctions programs in place. Individuals, organizations, entities and assets allegedly associated with narcotics trafficking may be designated on the SDN List under either the SDNT or SDNTK program.

The SDNT sanctions program targets those thought to be associated with narcotics trafficking operations in Colombia, specifically the Cali cartel. OFAC derives this designation power from Executive Order 12978.

The SDNTK sanctions program applies to all others allegedly associated with narcotics trafficking, wherever located. The SDNTK sanctions program became effective as part of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. Interestingly, many SDNTK designations arise out of Colombia. However, the designations fall under the SDNTK program because they are not affiliated with the Cali cartel.

The following entity was deleted from OFAC’s SDN List under the SDNTK sanctions program:

MERCURIO INTERNACIONAL S.A., Transversal 71D No. 26-94 Sur, Local 3504, Bogota, Colombia; Avenida Carrera 15 No. 100-69, Oficina 303, Bogota, Colombia; Carrera 15 No. 93-60 Local 205, Bogota, Colombia; Calle 5 No. 50-103, Local C108, Cali, Colombia; Carrera 1 No. 61A-30, Locales 80 y 81, Cali, Colombia; Calle 19 No. 6-48, Oficinas 403 y 404, Pereira, Colombia; Carrera 14 No. 18-56, Locales 34 y 35, Piso 3, Armenia, Colombia; Carrera 43A No. 34-95, Local 253, Medellin, Colombia; Carrera 54 No. 72-147, Local 144, Barranquilla, Colombia; NIT # 830063708-7 (Colombia) [SDNTK]

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share


Ivory Coast Treasury Catches Fire; President Feels Heat of Financial Sanctions

February 10, 2011

A fire at the Treasury building in downtown Abidjan on Tuesday destroyed financial records on at least three floors, officials said. The fire comes at a time of increasing fiscal strain for the president, Laurent Gbagbo, who is facing international financial sanctions because he has refused to step down after losing an election in November. Last week, the United States ambassador, Phillip Carter, said Gbagbo had been extorting businesses to pay their taxes in advance.

In January, Gbagbo and his wife, Simone Gbagbo, were targeted by OFAC and added to the Specially Designated Nationals List. As a result, U.S. persons are prohibited from conducting financial or commercial transactions with Gbagbo and his wife, and any assets of the designees within U.S. jurisdiction are frozen.

Also designated were three of Gbagbo’s senior advisors and members of his inner circle, Desire Tagro, Pascal Affi N’Guessan, and Alcide Ilahiri Djedje for acting for or on his behalf. View the Treasury Department press release here.

Gbagbo became president of the Ivory Coast in 2000, defeating a candidate backed by a military junta that had seized power the year before. His term ended in 2005, but he stayed on amidst lingering rebellion in the country’s north and deep splits in the country’s leadership. He was defeated in an election in November 2010 but has shown no intention of stepping down.

Alassane Ouattara, the man the United Nations, the African Union and other foreign powers say defeated Gbagbo, remains blockaded in a hotel by Gbagbo’s security forces, even as new sanctions and financial pressures rain down almost daily on Gbagbo. Veteran observers say the country may be headed for another civil war. According to the United Nations, more than 200 people have been killed in postelection violence.

Gbagbo has control over one of Africa’s most valuable commodities, cocoa (Ivory Coast is the world’s biggest producer). However, with his recent SDN designation, Gbagbo will not be able to engage in any transaction with a person, business or entity with financial ties to the United States.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share


U.S. Treasury Designates Lebanese Canadian Bank Sal as a “Primary Money Laundering Concern”

February 10, 2011

The U.S. Treasury Department says the Lebanese Canadian Bank SAL together with its subsidiaries (LCB) has laundered hundreds of millions of dollars for a drug trafficking group with ties to Hezbollah, which Washington considers a terrorist organization.

The Treasury Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration say Lebanese Canadian Bank SAL has been designated a “primary money laundering concern” for allegedly helping launder up to $200 million a month for a Lebanese-based drug smuggling group. The agencies say alleged drug kingpin Ayman Joumaa runs the ring.

LCB has been designated under Section 311 of the USA Patriot Act. Section 311 actions are distinct from designations brought by Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), which are applied more broadly, prohibit transactions and trigger asset freezing obligations. For an overview of Section 311 of the USA Patriot Act, please click here.

Allegedly, Joumaa and his Lebanon-based drug trafficking and money laundering network, along with several other individuals, have used LCB to launder narcotics proceeds as part of this international money laundering network. On January 26, Treasury designated Joumaa along with nine individuals and 19 entities in his network as Specially Designated Narcotics Traffickers pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act). Following today’s action by the Treasury, more individuals may soon face an OFAC SDN designation.

The Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) also today filed a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM), in which it proposes prohibiting U.S. financial institutions from opening or maintaining correspondent or payable-through accounts for LCB.

For a complete reading of the Treasury press release, please click here.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

Bookmark and Share